Historical Marker Search

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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2RS_charcoal-making-on-maryland-heights_Knoxville-MD.html
The charcoal industry required wood; Maryland Heights offered plenty. From 1810 to 1848 the Antietam Iron Works, 7 miles to the north, cut trees on the mountain to make charcoal to fuel its furnace and forges. The burning charcoal helped produce r…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2RQ_hiking-maryland-heights_Knoxville-MD.html
Here the trail divides and the choice is yours. Time and hiking difficulties are important factors as you select your trail route. The Stone Fort TrailTo your left, is a strenuous but rewarding hike to the summit. The route passes Civil War for…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2RG_making-a-mountain-citadel_Knoxville-MD.html
Tired and breathless? You are experiencing the hardship of a Union soldier climbing to reach his work place (a fort) or his home (a tent or log cabin). Try ascending this road hauling a 9,700-pound gun tube or a week's supply of water. From 1862 t…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2RA_naval-battery_Knoxville-MD.html
Positioned 300 feet above the Potomac River the Naval Battery was the first Union fortification on Maryland Heights. Hastily built in May 1862, its naval guns were rushed here from the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard. Along with a detachment of 300 sa…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2R7_maryland-heights-mountain-fortress-of-harpers-ferry_Knoxville-MD.html
You are standing on the border between North and South during the Civil War. As the highest ridge surrounding Harpers Ferry, Maryland Heights played a prominent role in the strategic operations of both the Union and Confederacy. Southern force…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2R3_lift-lock-33_Knoxville-MD.html
Here, the forces of nature created a natural corridor for commerce. The Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers carved a notch in the mountains, providing passage west. Communities grew up on both sides of the river and later a turnpike, railroad, and canal…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1ZC_100-pounder-battery-heaviest-and-highest_Knoxville-MD.html
During an inspection in late April 1863, Brig. Gen. John G. Barnard recommended that a gun be placed at a high point on this crest, "surrounded by a wall of sandbags, and arranged to fire not only on Loudoun Heights [across the Potomac] but into e…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMRC_brownsville-pass-semmes-gamble_Knoxville-MD.html
General Robert E. Lee directed Major General Lafayette McLaws to close in on the Federal garrison at Harper's Ferry via Elk Ridge, west of South Mountain. McLaws' route from Frederick took him through Middletown, where he turned southwest on the M…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMP8_st-lukes-episcopal-church_Knoxville-MD.html
During the civil war, St. Luke's served as headquarters for General Lafayette McLaws, who's troops from the Army of Northern Virginia were bivouacked around Brownsville, September 11, 1862. It served as a hospital for his wounded following the Bat…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMO9_gath-the-man-and-his-mountain_Knoxville-MD.html
George Alfred Townsend, known by his pen name of "GATH," was born in Georgetown, Delaware, in 1841. One of the youngest and most renowned special correspondents of his time, he reported on politics and war in both the United States and abroad. In …
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