Historical Marker Search

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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM288N_krutch-park_Knoxville-TN.html
Krutch Park is the legacy of Charles Krutch, the last survivor of an eccentric and talented family. When they first arrived in Knoxville in the 1850's the proud German clan spelled their name Kr├╝tsch (the name is pronounced Krootch). Several of t…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM286X_james-park-house_Knoxville-TN.html
The Foundation for this house was laid by Governor John Sevier on a block bought from Knoxville founder James White in 1797. James Park, pioneer merchant and Knoxville's second mayor, completed the main house in 1812. His son, Dr. James Park occup…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM285W_land-grant-university_Knoxville-TN.html
In 1867, by resolution of the U.S. Congress, Tennessee became eligible to designate an institution to teach areas of learning related to agriculture and the mechanic arts and to receive the proceeds from the sale of federal land as prescribed by t…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM285L_desegregation-of-the-university-of-tennessee_Knoxville-TN.html
During a federal lawsuit in 1952, the University of Tennessee opened enrollment in the graduate and law programs of the institution to African Americans. Gene Mitchell Gray enrolled in graduate school, and Lincoln Blakeney enrolled in the College …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM26C1_father-abram-j-ryan_Knoxville-TN.html
Confederate chaplain, poet of the Confederacy, author of the requiem of the Lost Cause, "The Conquered Banner," written at Knoxville soon after Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865, and pastor of the Immaculate Concep…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25H9_byington_Knoxville-TN.html
Born circa 1862 in McMinn County, Tennessee, Moses Brownlow Byington Sr., moved to the Beaver Ridge community circa 1883. He was instrumental in establishing the town of Byington and two major landmarks: The Byington L & N Railroad Station around …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM22DH_ut-recsports-complex_Knoxville-TN.html
Although no permanent villages of campsites were located on this site prior to the arrival of settlers, this property was part of the tribal lands of the Cherokee Nation. In the late 1800's and early 1900's, this property was used as pasture fo…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM22DG_knox-county_Knoxville-TN.html
Washington's Chief of Artillery in the Revolutionary War. Secretary of War in Washington's Cabinet. One of the founders and first secretary of the Society of the Cincinnati.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM22DF_bartletts-station_Knoxville-TN.html
Nicholas Bartlett built a mill 300 ft. downstream about 1785. When Blount County was created in 1795, its mill-pond was a turning point from the Stock Creek boundary to run toward Bay's Mountain. The mill was used as a fort in the Indian troubles …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM22DD_in-grateful-memory-to-the-defenders-of-cavett-blockhouse_Knoxville-TN.html
Upon this spot stood the house of Alexander Cavett who was murdered together with two men and the Cavett family of twelve, September 25th, 1793, after heroic resistance against a combined Creek and Cherokee force numbering one thousand warriors, t…
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