Historical Marker Search

You searched for City|State: liberty hill, tx

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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMGKK_williams-buck-cemetery_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Legend surrounds the first years of this burial ground. Local oral history relates that among the arliest graves are those of a slave called Willie Osborne and an unknown native American. Members of the Stephens family, ambushed by Indians in 1854…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMGK3_rock-house-community_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
A pioneer agricultural community of Williamson County, this site was first settled in the late 1840s by Uriah H. Anderson, a native of Tennessee who received a land grant here from the state of Texas. By 1857 a rural school was in operation and cl…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2KH_manuel-flores_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
In this vicinity, Manuel Flores, an emissary of the Mexican government, with a small group of men conveying ammunition to the Indians on the Lampasas River, was surprised by Rangers under Lieutenant J. O. Rice in May, 1839, and killed.
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2GC_liberty-hill-methodist-church_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Founded 1854 (1.5 mi. NW of here). Construction of 3-story building of native stone for use of the church, school, and Masonic lodge was begun in 1870 on land given by T. S. Snyder. Upper stories were removed and choir space added in 1905; wings a…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2GB_liberty-hill-masonic-hall_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Chartered in 1875, Liberty Hill Lodge No. 432, A. F. & A. M., met first in the Methodist church. When this building was finished in 1883, the Masons purchased the top floor for their lodge hall and built an exterior wooden stairway to the room. Th…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2FR_liberty-hill-cemetery_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Weathered gravestones show usage of this spot for burials since 1852, when the earliest settlers were establishing homes in area. The first formal grant of land here as a community burial ground was made by John T. and Amelia Edwards Bryson in 187…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM2CC_john-g-matthews_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Tennessee native John Giles Matthews came to Texas with his parents in 1839 and settled in the new town of Austin. A Ranger for the Republic of Texas, Matthews served in the Mexican War and the Civil War before moving to Williamson County in 1870.…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM298_hopewell-cemetery_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Pioneers who settled here in the 1840s and established the town of Hopewell faced many hardships, including Indian raids. Wofford and Mary Johnson and their daughter were killed by Comanches nearby in 1863. They were buried at this site near the g…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM296_heinatz-homestead_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Built in fall of 1850, along with adjoining store and post office, all of native stone, by John Frederick Heinatz (1822-91), a settler from Germany. He was for many years postmaster of Bagdad, a public school trustee, superintendent of Sunday Scho…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM1M6_first-baptist-church-of-liberty-hill_Liberty-Hill-TX.html
Successor to Zion Baptist Church and the Liberty Hill Missionary Baptist Church of Christ, which merged 1854, and met in a brush arbor or in Silent Grove School, 4 miles to the west. When Austin & Northwestern Railroad was built, Liberty Hill move…
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