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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMHWR_hamilton-station_Hamilton-VA.html
One of the oldest on the line, Hamilton's train station dates from 1870. It was not in the original plan. When the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railway (later the Washington & Old Dominion) was established in the 1840s, its owners intended to h…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMHE3_the-independent-loudoun-rangers_Lovettsville-VA.html
The Independent Loudoun Rangers consisted of two small cavalry companies recruited by Waterford miller Samuel Means from Lovettsville's and Waterford's Unionists. Mustered into Federal service starting June 20, 1862, the Rangers were the only orga…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMGZ2_vestals-gap-road-iv_Sterling-VA.html
The Vestal's Gap Road was a major east-west trade and travel route. George Washington used it from 1753 to 1799 as he traveled on surveying business, for personal reasons and for military purposes in the French and Indian Wars. There were several …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMGZ1_vestals-gap-road-iii_Sterling-VA.html
In 1722 Governor Spotswood's treaty with the Indians was ratified, which kept them west of the Blue Ridge Mountains and north of the Potomac River. Early settlers found the Indian trails in Loudoun County and made them into roads. Loudoun County s…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMGZ0_vestals-gap-road-ii_Sterling-VA.html
The local Indians followed the paths made by the animals they sought as game and made them into regularly used trails. Archaeologists have found and investigated many sites where Indians lived along the Potomac River and the larger creeks such as …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMGYT_vestals-gap-road-i_Sterling-VA.html
Before man traveled this way, the wild animals that inhabited this area made a trail through the grassland and woods which they followed to reach new grazing areas. Bison and deer created and followed the path seeking fresh grass for food, followe…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMG5Q_purcellville-station_Purcellville-VA.html
The tracks are long gone, but Purcellville's train station still occupies the ground it has stood on since 1904. It replaced a depot built at about the same time that the railroad arrived in 1874 and accommodated passengers, mail, and freight. …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMG4D_beyond-purcellville_Purcellville-VA.html
The trail ends here but the story does not. The founders of the Alexandria, Loudoun, & Hampshire (later the W&OD) sought to rival the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad for the coal of West Virginia and the trade of the Ohio Valley. By 1900 the railroad fi…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMF6M_old-potts-graveyard_Purcellville-VA.html
David Potts, a quaker, established this cemetery from a portion of his farm. He migrated here from Philadelphia Co. Pa. and in 1746 leased 866 acres of land from Catesby Cocke which he later purchased. He was born about the year 1700 and died 1768…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HMDD0_ashburn-station_Ashburn-VA.html
At least two different railroad stations stood where you are now standing. When the Alexandra, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad (later the W&OD) arrived in 1860, the aptly named crossroads of Farmwell became one of the many rail stops that served agra…
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