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historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM26QA_salamander_Lake-Oswego-OR.html
This mass of solidified iron from the hearth of the Oswego furnace is known as a 'Salamander'. It is named after a mythological amphibian that lived in fire. Salamanders often formed in the bottom of 19th Century iron furnaces and were removed, wi…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM26Q9_the-man-from-k-787-asx-601-700-ksix-returned-with-eels-to-feed-his-people_Lake-Oswego-OR.html
Ikanum are traditional stories. One such story from Victoria Howard of Grand Ronde is told about the area around Lake Oswego. The story tells of a particularly hostile winter, in which cold and starvation threatened the entire village of k̓a…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM26Q2_green-street_Lake-Oswego-OR.html
Henry Dodge Green and his brother John Green came to Oregon from New York in 1852. In partnership with H. C. Leonard, the Green brothers procured the gas and water franchises for the City of Portland. The cost of shipping cast-iron gas and water p…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM26PB_lakewood-school-1928_Lake-Oswego-OR.html
On this site in 1893, Oswego's first public school was built and served the hildren of the town until it was outgrown, and replaced in 1928 by this handsome Colonial Revival style structure. Originally called Oswego Grammar School, it was renamed …
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM26O1_lower-oswego-creek-bridge_Lake-Oswego-OR.html
"Charcoal haulers would cross the covered bridge and follow the trail along the river...." Mary Goodall, Oregon's Iron Dream, (1958, p. 76) At least four bridges have been built at the mouth of Oswego Creek and adjacent to Oswego Landing ove…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25QT_golden_Wolf-Creek-OR.html
Established in 1890, this mining town was unique in Western annals in that it had two churches and no saloons. The miners went to Placer off Grave Creek for "refreshments". Rev. William Ruble, leader of a group commonly known as "Campbellites" b…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25QS_gold_Wolf-Creek-OR.html
(Three panels are located at this information kiosk:) Imagine carrying just a backpack and a pick and hearing the shouts of "Gold!" as the rang through this valley. It's 1851. You've traveled hundreds of miles to make you fortune in C…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25Q7_grave-creek_Wolf-Creek-OR.html
In 1846 the Crowley Family arrived in the valley with the first wagon train over the Applegate Trail. Martha Leland Crowley, a daughter, succumbed to typhoid fever at the age of 16. She was buried here in a casket made of timber boards from som…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25Q6_the-applegate-trail_Wolf-Creek-OR.html
Jesse and Lindsay Applegate, members of the first wave of Oregon Trail emigrants, watched their ten-year old sons drown in the Columbia River when a boat overturned in the rapids near The Dalles in 1843. Once their families were settled, the Apple…
historicalmarkerproject/markers/HM25Q5_febble-hungry-and-haggard_Wolf-Creek-OR.html
Generations of Oregon school children learned the lyrics of a song: "Hurry up oh pioneers, your faithful little band must never fail." Applegate Trail emigrants struggled to follow this advice, but the mountainous terrain of northern Josephine Cou…
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