Rogersville Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.

Rogersville Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (HM1BH0)

Location: Rogersville, AL 35652 Lauderdale County
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Country: United States of America
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N 34° 49.613', W 87° 17.762'

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Inscription
(side 1)
The earliest place of worship in Rogersville was brush arbor located approximately 200 yards west of this historic location in what is now the old Liberty Cemetery. A building in which several faiths worshipped was later constructed on that site. This property was part of the 158 acres purchased from the U.S. Government by Hugh Proter on March 6, 1819. Hugh and his wife, Sarah, sold part of this land to George Simmons on December 21, 1842. Afterward, the property changed ownership several times. On October 12, 1848, two acres were deeded to the tenants in common: Thomas Davenport, Trustee for the Methodist Episcopal Presbyterian Church; Daniel W. Haraway, Trustee for the ContinentalPresbyterian Church; Jonathan M. Cunningham, Trustee for Benevolent Division No. 17 Sons of Temperance; and Peter F. Patrick, Trustee for the Freemasons.

The trustee constructed a meeting house on the two-acre lot about 1855 when trust agreement was made with the creditor.
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(side 2)
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This building was two stories high and was used as a church serving several faiths and also as a community school. At an unknown date; this building burned and the present one was erected in 1889.

According to Hall's Index of American Presbyterian Congregations, the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Rogersville, Alabama, was first reported in 1890 by the Presbytery of McGready, Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In 1907, the congregation split and the one which remained here became the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., also known as the First Presbyterian Church. This congregation was dissolved or dropped from the roll in 1974.

The property was deeded to the Town of Rogersville on September 20, 1975. In an effort to restore the historic property, a group of local citizens formed the Rogersville Historical Preservation Committee in 1997. Funds were donated by local citizens and a grant was secure by State Representative James Hamilton of Rogersville. A dedication of the restored church and grounds was held on September 28, 1997. The historic church holds the distinction of being the last surviving original place of worship in Rogersville.
Details
HM NumberHM1BH0
Tags
Year Placed2013
Placed ByEast Lauderdale Historical Society
Marker ConditionNo reports yet
Date Added Sunday, October 5th, 2014 at 1:44am PDT -07:00
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Locationbig map
UTM (WGS84 Datum)16S E 472929 N 3853885
Decimal Degrees34.82688333, -87.29603333
Degrees and Decimal MinutesN 34° 49.613', W 87° 17.762'
Degrees, Minutes and Seconds34° 49' 36.78" N, 87° 17' 45.72" W
Driving DirectionsGoogle Maps
Area Code(s)256
Closest Postal AddressAt or near 24601-24681 College St, Rogersville AL 35652, US
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